Posts Tagged ‘future of education’

Vivienne Ming: How to Robot-Proof (Not Only Kids but also Ourselves)

Dr. Ming was named one of 10 Women to Watch in Tech in 2013 by Inc. Magazine. She is a theoretical neuroscientist, technologist and entrepreneur. She co-founded Socos company, where machine learning and cognitive neuroscience combine to maximize students’ life outcomes. She sits on the boards of StartOut, The Palm Center, Emozia, Engender, and Genderis Inc., and is a Chief Science Advisor to Cornerstone Capital, Platypus Institute, Shiftgig, and Bayes Impact. She is an author of the upcoming “How to Robot-Proof Your Kids” and “The Tax on Being Different”.

zdroj: Czech&Slovak Leaders

“The Best Way to Predict the Future Is to Create It” was the opening quote of Singularity University, made by its co-founder Peter Diamandis and being such, summarizes the unique approach of this two-day conference that took place at the Prague Žofín Palace from March 5-6, 2018. Singularity University has been called an Ivy League university from the future and described as a conference like no other. Imagine an event that in two days covers highly scientific expert subjects from artificial intelligence, self-driving cars, the latest development in medicine and biotechnology, the future of finance and blockchain, alongside the wider societal concerns like future of work, future of education or exponential growth and abundance.

Perhaps there is no coincidence, only synchronicity, as to the venue. The Knights Hall at Žofín Palace in Prague used to be a very special place for the Czech elite in the middle of the 19th century and played a significant role during the Czech nationalist revival. Based on historic accounts, it was believed that had the heavy chandelier fallen from the ceiling, no one speaking Czech would be left, as most of the Czech educated largely male group taking part in the national revival movement, used to always be together.

At first, it seemed almost impossible to choose one conference speaker for our interview. On the other hand, it does not come as a surprise, that I chose Dr. Vivienne Ming who was giving a keynote speech on How to Robot-Proof Your Kids. Not only is the subject of education, learning and development based on talents and passion important for me professionally, but also personally. I am a mother of a ten-year old boy, who is extroverted, communicative and soft-skills advanced. By the way, we usually tend to associate these skills with girls in our society. I was glad to hear that my son is good at five general cognitive abilities such as social skills, self-regulated learning, emotional intelligence and creativity, since these skills were singled out by Dr. Ming as necessary for the future. Unfortunately, I was brought back to the present by my son’s private tutor, who called me right after Dr. Ming’s presentation to let me know that my son is unlikely to pass the exam for the eight-year high school. His five-year primary language school program partly co-financed by the EU is coming to an end. Given the competitiveness of the eight-year high school system in the Czech Republic, like many Czech parents, we have gone through the ordeal in investing large amounts of time, energy and money during the last eight months trying to improve his weak spots in mathematics, analytical thinking and information-based learning. The contrast between what is needed for the future and what is the status quo could not be any starker.

Dr. Ming is also a great example of a leader. Her life journey was not easy. She failed out of university and almost took her own life. She then discovered her life purpose: to make the lives of other people better. This discovery gave her the drive to complete a BA in neuroscience in only one year! She had undergone gender transition. Since then, she has had amazing success in her field, is a mother of two kids and specializes in the future of human potential. She has worked on applications to help patients with diabetes, bipolar disorders and learning.

Dr. Ming started her conference speech with a short statement,“The problem with the education system is that everyone has an opinion about it. Everyone is different, yet we develop systems meant for one type person”. I wondered whether she was aware of the fact that in the Czech Republic, the educational system has become prey for politicians and a panacea to many societal problems. The economy is currently suffering from the lack of manual workers? Let us introduce both manual skills classes and even agriculture lessons to primary school curriculum. The population is afraid of terrorism? Let us also include civic defense classes. Many students are choosing humanities instead of STEM studies? Let us introduce obligatory high-school graduation from mathematics. All of these implemented, without any deeper debate, without following latest expert debates and successful trends in education.

Dr. Ming then continued “Role modelling is absolutely essential for parenthood. Be the person you want your kids to be”. Wow, another challenging notion in a country, where the majority of parents still believe that it is up to school to provide both education and also upbringing and they are not ready to take part.

Dr. Ming, your talk was fascinating. Let us start with your conclusion. Find your talent and grow it. But how? On one hand, there are numerous possibilities, on the other hand, many young people do not know how to navigate themselves in today’s complex world.

Recently, I had the privilege to give a convocation at the school where I once failed and subsequently, after my amazing success, I gave my talk on three lessons I would do differently.

The first lesson states whatever you do right now, go all in. You are right about many young people receiving various contradictory advice from their surroundings but if they do not invest time and energy, if they do not try hard, how can they find out if they are going to love and succeed in an area? You are unlikely to be an expert at anything from the day one. I love what I do, but I had to struggle so many times to find the answer.

The second lesson says construct your purpose. There is not one thing you are meant to do in this world. You get to build your purpose yourself. You have to search for it, look for the clues.

The last lesson is about having the courage to “die” and start all over again. It takes about seven years to truly master something, therefore starting at the age of 11 and living up to 88 years, you have seven opportunities to become truly great at something. This notion is wonderful because it frees you from the pressure that one decision will influence the rest of your life. Your purpose will guide you, but on each journey, you will go deeper. Look at my life-story. As a man, my life was a massive failure. On my journey I became a scientist, an entrepreneur, and then a mum. There is no wrong choice if you are honest about it. Listen to what others say, but at the end it is your choice and again, go all in. Every time I have had an invention, it was thanks to these transition moments. From a neuroscientist into an educational company, to inventing treatments for diabetes and bipolar disease.

Your latest research is about maximizing human potential and you have become a strong advocate of soft-skills that you do not like to be called soft-skills, as they are measurable. The Czech educational system has witnessed the latest attempts to introduce farming lessons, manual workshops and civic defense classes to respond to pressure from the industry rather than to prepare kids for the future. What do you think about the future of education?

I am not criticizing specific policy choice but rather the broad policy choice about training people to do specific things. If you told me that the government is introducing programming, STEM only education and intellectual skills, I would be also worried. I can build an AI system that can do all of the above better. Therefore, the most disrupted careers will be in advising – whether financial, legal or medical. Economically speaking, earthly skills, such as agriculture will be more economically resilient than professional skills. Perhaps the labor cost is still cheap in the Czech Republic, but we should not forget that the labor cost runs downhill and ends in Rwanda. But governmental policy also affects the discussion in the US. As we will not allow Mexican immigrants to do low wage manual jobs, we might be constructing robots to do them, since no US worker is willing to pick food anymore.

What are the main points that governments are missing?

It is very simple policy trap in the form of solving the last problem. It is not about forward thinking – what the problem is going to look like in ten to twenty years. I am not a futurist but I knowthat a small number of people will be writing codes in twenty years. You need to look at the broader picture. You need to watch where the economy is moving. What is the US shifting towards, what is China shifting towards, what is happening in India and elsewhere?

Our 15 minutes is up. You have been quite disruptive also in regards to the future of universities. You research proved that university diplomas are not predictive as to the successful future. Charles University in Prague is celebrating 650 years of existence. What future do you see for classical universities?

University is a great place once you have all the meta learning skills. However, universities themselves have succumbed to the idea of building people for work-life rather than building better people to explore ideas. If I hire graduate students, I do not care whether they know neuroscience. I care about them being creative and adaptive. Universities will need to change themselves. But the bottom two-thirds will need to disappear as our AI has identified these as negative predictors. The top one-third will need to restructure. Let us discuss how to create interdisciplinary curricula instead of trapping people into degrees. How do we retrain people, how do we build resilience and growth mindset, and creative thinking? Let us invent something that will make the world better together. And I will not lead the project, being a scientific expert, but rather the students themselves will lead the experiments. How does that sound?

Immediately after the interview I downloaded the application Muse Dr. Ming developed. It is designed for parents to develop their children by spending quality time with them while enhancing children’s learning with fun daily activities. Based on your answers describing your child’s character and behavior, you start receiving tips for activities, so eventually your kid can become “a creative, adaptive problem solver”,as this is the only robot-proof category for the future. It proves that when the government is failing, businesses and start-ups can lead the way. And that was my positive take away from the two-day conference as a whole.

The interview was published in Czech & Slovak Leaders magazine.

BOOK REVIEW: UnSelfie

Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World? The book UnSelfie by Dr. Michele Borba offers a 9-step program to help parents cultivate empathy in children, from birth to young adulthood—and explains why developing a healthy sense of empathy is a key predictor of which kids will thrive and succeed in the future. Radka Dohnalová, ATAIRU Founder and Managing Partner reviewed this book in context of topics Future of Education and Leadership.

Children today live in a self-absorbed culture that makes them ill-equipped to understand the emotions of others. When researching the key skills we will need for the future, empathy plays a critical role, not just for children but also in leadership. I loved this book because it shows how parents and teachers can help children learn to feel greater empathy by teaching them about emotions and showing them how their actions affect others. It can be also a great spurce of inspiration for leadership. Here are some of the key thoughts.
Evidence shows that empathy is decreasing among young people, while narcissism is on the rise.
Did you know that “selfie” was voted word of the year in 2014 by Oxford Dictionaries? The decision was made following a 17,000 percent increase in the word’s usage over the previous year.
This obsession with photos of ourselves is symptomatic of an all-about-me society that’s ruled by ego, in which everybody wants to be the center of attention. Psychologists are even in agreement that empathy is on the decline, while narcissism among young adults is steadily rising.
Just take psychologist Sarah Konrath, whose University of Michigan, Ann Arbor team considered 72 behavioral studies among college students over the last three decades. Their results, which were published in Personality and Sociology Review, paint a disturbing picture.
They found that students today are 40 percent less empathetic than their predecessors were 30 years ago. In addition, rates of narcissistic behavior, including selfishness, an inflated sense of self-importance and a tremendous need for admiration, have soared by a whopping 58 percent!
Or consider a Gallup poll that found that while only 12 percent of teenagers in the 1950s agreed with the statement “I am very important,” that figure has hovered around 80 percent since the late 1980s.
The drop in empathy is also made abundantly clear by the rise in bullying among school children. After all, children who bully others do so by dehumanizing their victims and failing to see life from their perspective, which is why soaring rates of bullying are a strong indicator of decreasing empathy.
And although children have always been mean to one another, recent studies have found that bullying has reached an all-time high in recent years. One study showed a 52-percent increase over a mere four years. Another study determined that children as young as three years old were engaging in bullying behavior.
But what’s perhaps most disturbing is that one out of every five middle schoolers reports considering suicide because of peer cruelty.
We can thus see that children today are much more self-absorbed than previous generations were at the same age – but that doesn’t mean that they have to stay this way.
Adults can help kids develop emotional literacy.
Just as they’re not born being able to change their own diapers, kids don’t come out of the womb knowing how to understand and act with empathy. Even especially bright kids need years of experience before they can read body language and facial cues with fluency.
That being said, you can coach your children through this process.
First, you can use face-to-face contact to teach kids to read emotional signals. This is crucial, since children and teens are especially prone to misreading such gestures, which causes them – and, potentially, those around them – lots of unnecessary suffering. To lend them a hand, pay special attention to your own body language and be ready to explain things like, “don’t worry, I’m not angry. I’m just tired. If I rub my eyes you’ll know I’m tired.” You can also do some casual people watching with your child. During a trip to the mall, you might ask, “who looks angry, tired or bored?”
Second, you can use books and films to teach kids about emotions. To do so, you might watch a few minutes of a TV soap opera together with the sound on mute and make a game of guessing how the actors feel. This kind of exercise is a useful way to teach children about body language. Books are also great for this. If the main character in a story expresses an emotion, ask your children, “how can we tell he’s scared?” or “have you ever felt like that?” Doing so will give your kids an opportunity to understand an emotion from the inside out. And finally, give your kids an emotional vocabulary. After all, you can’t talk about something without the appropriate language to express it, and that’s especially the case when it comes to emotions. So, expose your children to words like “eager,” “confident” or “dismayed” that go beyond the simple emotions of “happy” and “sad.” To make sure you’re using emotional words when speaking with your children, you can make a point of talking about your own feelings. Be especially sure to use lots of emotional words when playing with boys, as they tend to hear less of this language in their daily lives.

source: Twitter @micheleborba

Teach kids empathy by asking them to walk in another person’s shoes.
What do you need to do to make sure your child thrives? Well, it’s essential for her to be able to advocate for her own interests – but that’s not enough.
To be happy and successful, kids also need empathy. In fact, children who understand the perspectives of others have more friends and stronger, closer relationships than self-absorbed children. Not only that, but empathetic children are happier, better adjusted and more likely to resolve conflicts or stand up for victims.
Such positive traits are known as the Empathy Advantage and they’re linked to more favorable life outcomes, including better job prospects, higher salaries and even greater educational attainment.
Luckily, any child can develop the Empathy Advantage through a few careful exercises, and the first of these is to reverse sides in an argument.
Say your two children come running to you, each begging for you to take their side in a disagreement. Instead of doing so, ask each child what he or she thinks the other child will say about the situation. By grappling with this question, both children will learn to see the situation through the other child’s eyes.
Another way you can develop your children’s empathy is through the use of props and role play. This kind of strategy will help your child step outside of her own world and into that of another. For instance, you can put on a tiara, an army boot or a sari, then ask your child who they think the wearer of these objects is and what they think about life. What are that person’s fears, hopes and dreams?

This is also a good approach if your child bullies someone. While young children might not understand questions like “how would you like it if Bobby did that to you?”, props can help them empathize. So, if you instead say “here’s Bobby’s hat. You be Bobby and I’ll be you,” and then act out a scene in which you’re mean to Bobby, most children will come away from the experience understanding how painful it is to be bullied.

Future of Education

Radka has been researching the future of education in this world. She has summarized her findings based on Peter Diamondis` summit Abundance 360 in the article below. She is also a parent of three children.

Education, alongside health care and travel, is one of the areas anticipating a radical change in the near future. The basic tenets and principles of contemporary education were set more than two centuries ago with a focus on standardization and conformity. However, the context and demands of the world of today are far different, and our goal is to prepare children not only for their future employment, but for life itself. We need to change our outlook, our lifestyle and our education accordingly.

5 Greatest Problem of the Current Educational System

I have selected five problems that concern me the most in this context:

1. Children are not learning relevant skills to prepare them for real life

When I compare what I learned at school to what I actually use in my life, the overlap is minimal. Aside from traditional subjects such as mathematics, physics, languages and history, there’s a real need for skills that are applicable for anyone, regardless of their future profession. These include team work, conflict resolution, critical thinking and applying one’s own creativity or enterpreneurship.

2. Uniform approach to each child

One set of information is taught by one teacher, at one speed, in one age group. This approach leads to some children falling behind and others being bored, in result destroying the motivation of them both. We’re not talking about teaching mathematics to some children and not to others, but about individualizing its instruction – adjusting the tempo and content to the child’s individual level and using practice exercises that interest the child. Each child has their own unique natural talents and passions, which may never be discovered and developed in a uniform environment.

3. Everything is set with minimal room for imagination and creativity

Forced busyness and memorization are two main influences that diminish and destroy our creativity in school. Every day is scheduled and portioned out into clearly differentiated lessons and activities. Because of the focus on learning “word by word” and filling every available minute, we lose the ability to create and make connections between topics and areas. Creativity is critically important because it allows us to link ideas, make discoveries, approach problems from different perspectives and thus solve them.

4. There is too much emphasis on results, losing the love of learning for its own sake

The current system places the greatest emphasis on test results, fulfilling the requirements and getting our grades and degrees. We see results as the key to a better future, and allow them to overshadow the learning process itself. This destroys the whole purpose of education. Instead, it‘s crucial to stimulate children’s curiosity, love of learning and inner motivation, which are key for lifelong learning.

5. Grades demotivate

The grading system is built on an „A“ as the highest prize, with each mistake diminishing and bringing down the perfect score. This can lead to demotivation or fear of bad grades. Instead, we could take inspiration from gaming scores, where each partial success increases the score, and therefore positively encourages effort.

8 Areas Which Will Transform Education in the 21st Century

1. Discovery and development of individual talents and passions

Each one of us has the potential to excel in something. We can identify this potential through our natural talents and passions, giving us the chance to truly excel and to continuously achieve, with ease and joy. One of the main tasks of education should be to help children find their potential and fulfill it.

2. Communication and cooperation

No matter what we do in life, it is important for us to be able to communicate and cooperate with others. To do so, we need to develop our emotional intelligence, empathy and storytelling skills. Thanks to the ability to understand others and communicate our ideas clearly, we can excite others, create teams and realize great visions.

3. Basic life skills

In essence, everyone wants to be happy and healthy. However, current education focuses chiefly on skills required for work, such as reading comprehension, language abilities, and foundations of logic, mathematics and geometry. Topics relating to health and happiness used to be an integral part of education in both classical antiquity and during the Renaissance, and we should once again pay them the attention they deserve.

4. Creativity and flexibility

The fast-paced present time requires an ever greater ability to think creatively and quickly react to change. We must help children to consciously develop their creativity, whether through mathematics, sciences, music or technology… We can also help children practice and develop the ability to improvise and be open to change through games or improvisational theatre, which is built on contextual changes.

5. Stimulation of curiosity, experimentation and decision making

Curiosity is the drive behind most scientific and industrial discovery. It is the desire of an individual to find out how things work and how can they progress. It leads to the process of questioning, formulating hypotheses, designing, testing, and experimentation and decision making based on the acquired information.

6. Enterpreneurship and the ability to start new things

How to make a lot from a little? How to handle limited resources? How to solve a complex and confusing situation? To lead children to enterpreneurship means to stimulate their inventiveness. In practice, they will need the ability to search, connect and take advantage of limited resources, and also salesmanship and financial skills.

7. Technology and critical thinking

Virtual reality, 3D printing and other modern technologies are the tools of tomorrow, and therefore our children need to experience and experiment with them now. Coding is one of the new skills which will join mathematics and language in elementary curricula. And to orient ourselves in the amount of information, we will need critical skills more than ever before.

8. Sustainability and ethics in a global context

The world of today is faster, more connected and diverse than ever before. However, the passion for progress and technology should always go hand in hand with sustainability and ethical guidelines. It’s important to discuss the questions and dilemmas of today’s society in schools, allowing children to refine their moral compass and develop their own opinions.

Key learnings from Abundance 360

Convergence Catalyzer

We tried different technologies. I was completely amazed by trying Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality and how it can enhance learning. It was such immersive, engaging and fun experience. Clearly, this will be the key technology in the future of education.

Leadership in exponential times

With Arianna Huffington

With Alex Kipman

With Peter Diamandis

Abundance 360 Summit

Abundance 360 Summit is the conference focusing on exponential technology and leadership in exponential time. As the main claim of the summit says: We live in the world of abundance is one thing. Creating it is another. The Summit is taking place 29-31 January 2017 in LA hosted by entrepreneur Peter Diamandis. My purpose of coming is about exploring the future of education. I believe that the way we (not just our children) learn is going to fundamentally transform over the next decade.

 

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